Ok. So I had a few things I’ve been wanting to share. Well, I’ll admit, I have a ton of stuff I’d like to share. And then, I come up with an idea and decide to Google about it.

 

Great, now I just went and Googled – “What do you call someone who Googles everything?”

  • Googler
  • Nethead
  • Netizen
  • Cybernaut
  • Net Abuser
  • Net Junkie
  • Cyberjunkie
  • Wired

 

Ok, that’s not what this Wednesday Share Day was supposed to be about. When I wrote my Grateful Sunday this past week I came up with, what I had thought, was my own idea, a term called Mindful Spending. I’m starting to use this term to help me get out of the stigma (or fear if you must be honest) of starting to follow a Budget. Very much like a Diet feels restrictive, I now call it Mindful Eating. Before I put the food in my mouth I ask, is it worth the calories? This is what also must be done to get my spending under control. Is this something I need or want? Can I afford it or is there a cheaper way?

 

So I decided to find out, is Mindful Spending a thang?

 

Looks like it wasn’t my idea after all. In fact, there’s tons of articles about Mindful Spending. So, since I became a Googler and just had to find out more information, if you too, would like to know more about using mindfulness when it comes to your purchases, check out the following links below.

 

Mindful Spending: The Happy Way to Financial Freedom

Mindful Spending: A Life and Money Hack

Why Mindful Spending is Better Than Budgeting

Mindful Spending: How This Author Saves a Lot of Her Money and How You Can Too

 

Great! Now I find out that in Japanese culture they use kakebo as a mindful way to track their money. It’s basically a budget with a journal noting where you are spending your money and journaling about the motivations behind that spending.

 

“A kakebo encourages you to look to the future, focus on the present and reflect on the past, but not in an overwhelming manner, and with plenty of wisdom and motivation sprinkled along the way.”

 

A kakebo includes affirmations, proverbs, and asking questions. It offers practical and motivating tips to teach you how to save more. It’s not just about money, but more about how self-awareness and self-discipline builds self-esteem and promotes peace of mind.

 

So there you have it. I didn’t make up the name, but I am going to continue using Mindful Spending, in addition to kakebo (maybe I can make my own journal entries as I go), so that I can eventually become debt free. My financial fears only keep me locked from the freedom I will experience when I learn to become a better steward of His money.

 

Yes, this is what a Googler does.

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